New Goreme Tour Travel Agency Cappadocia Turkey
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CAPPADOCIA TOURS
Green Tour
Red Tour
Silver Tour
Hot Air Balloon Flights
Whirling Dervishes
Turkish Bath
PRIVATE CAPPADOCIA TOURS
Tour 1: Essential Cappadocia
Tour 2: Highlights of Cappadocia
Tour 3: Outstanding Cappadocia
Tour 4: Off-the-beaten-track Cappadocia
Tour 5: Hiking in Cappadocia
One-day Express Private Tour
CAPPADOCIA HIKING TOURS
Golden Hiking Tour
Hiking Tour 1
Hiking Tour 2
Rose Valley Sunset Hiking Tour
EASTERN TURKEY TOURS
3-day private Mount Nemrut Tour
3-day Private Eastern Turkey Tour
EPHESUS TOURS
Full-day Ephesus Tour
Half-day Ephesus Tour
ISTANBUL TOURS
Istanbul Old City Tour
Bosphorus Cruise
Princes' Islands Tour
TURKEY PACKAGE TOURS
7-day Express Turkey Tour
10-day Turkey Tour
14-day Turkey Tour
Cooking Classes
Cooking class in a local house
Art and Handicrafts Classes
Ebru art classes
Making gourd lamps
Hotels in Turkey
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Rent a car
Tailor-made
Maps of Cappadocia
Photo Gallery
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About Turkey
Turkey is at the northeast end of the Mediterranean Sea in southeast Europe and southwest Asia. To the north is the Black Sea and to the west is the Aegean Sea. Its neighbors are Greece and Bulgaria to the west, Russia, Ukraine, and Romania to the north and northwest (through the Black Sea), Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Iran to the east, and Syria and Iraq to the south. The Dardanelles, the Sea of Marmara, and the Bosporus divide the country. Turkey in Europe comprises an area about equal to the state of Massachusetts. Turkey in Asia is about the size of Texas. Its center is a treeless plateau rimmed by mountains.

Anatolia (Turkey in Asia) was occupied in about 1900 B.C. by the Indo-European Hittites and, after the Hittite empire's collapse in 1200 B.C. by Phrygians and Lydians. The Persian Empire occupied the area in the 6th century B.C. giving way to the Roman Empire, then later the Byzantine Empire. The Ottoman Turks first appeared in the early 13th century, subjugating Turkish and Mongol bands pressing against the eastern borders of Byzantium and making the Christian Balkan states their vassals. They gradually spread through the Near East and Balkans, capturing Constantinople in 1453 and storming the gates of Vienna two centuries later. At its height, the Ottoman Empire stretched from the Persian Gulf to western Algeria. Lasting for 600 years, the Ottoman Empire was not only one of the most powerful empires in the history of the Mediterranean region, but it generated a great cultural outpouring of Islamic art, architecture, and literature.

After the reign of Sultan Süleyman I the Magnificent (1494–1566), the Ottoman Empire began to decline politically, administratively, and economically. By the 18th century, Russia was seeking to establish itself as the protector of Christians in Turkey's Balkan territories. Russian ambitions were checked by Britain and France in the Crimean War (1854–1856), but the Russo-Turkish War (1877–1878) gave Bulgaria virtual independence and Romania and Serbia liberation from their nominal allegiance to the sultan. Turkish weakness stimulated a revolt of young liberals known as the Young Turks in 1909. They forced Sultan Abdul Hamid to grant a constitution and install a liberal government. However, reforms were no barrier to further defeats in a war with Italy (1911–1912) and the Balkan Wars (1912–1913). Turkey sided with Germany in World War I, and, as a result, lost territory at the conclusion of the war

Turkey's current boundaries were drawn in 1923 at the Conference of Lausanne, and Turkey became a republic with Mustafa Kemal Atatürk as the first president. The Ottoman sultanate and caliphate were abolished, and modernization, reform, and industrialization began under Atatürk's direction. He secularized Turkish society, reducing Islam's dominant role and replacing Arabic with the Latin alphabet for writing the Turkish language. After Atatürk's death in 1938, parliamentary government and a multiparty system gradually took root in Turkey, despite periods of instability and brief intervals of military rule. Neutral during most of World War II, Turkey, on Feb. 23, 1945, declared war on Germany and Japan, but it took no active part in the conflict. Turkey became a full member of NATO in 1952, was a signatory in the Balkan Entente (1953), joined the Baghdad Pact (1955; later CENTO), joined the Organization for European Economic Cooperation (OEEC) and the Council of Europe, and became an associate member of the European Common Market in 1963

ATATURK

In 1923 Mustafa Kemal Ataturk was elected president of the new Turkish republic. He was reelected in 1927, 1931, and 1935—always by a unanimous parliament. With enormous energy he set out on a program of internal reform and “Westernization”; 15 years of his rule changed Turkey in the essential as well as the most minute aspects of its life . Although a dictator, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk tolerated limited opposition; but he was ruthless toward those he considered extremists. Regarding Islam as a conservative force, he abolished (1924) the caliphate (thereby disestablishing Islam as the state religion) and crippled religious opposition to reform.

Abroad, he pursued a policy of conciliation and neutrality. He established friendly relations with Turkey's neighbors, particularly the Soviet Union, helped to bring about the Balkan Entente, and freed Turkey from foreign influence, though it meant refusing capital investment for industrialization of the country. On his death he was succeeded as president by Ismet Inönü. In 1953 his remains were transferred to a new mausoleum in Ankara. He remains the object of cultlike devotion by many Turks.
 
» Istanbul
Istanbul
Hagia Sophia (Ayasofya)
Basilica Cistern (Yerebatan Sarayı)
Sultanahmet Square (Hippodrome)
Grand Bazaar (Kapalıçarşı)
The Spice Bazaar (Mısır Carşısı)
Topkapı Palace
The Blue Mosque (Sultan Ahmet Camii)
Rüstem Pasha Mosque (Rüstempaşa Camii)
Dolmabahçe Palace
The Princes' Islands

» Cappadocia
Cappadocia
Göreme Open Air Museum
Derinkuyu Underground City
Ihlara Valley
Paşabağ
Pigeon Valley (Güvercinlik vadisi)
White Valley (Akvadi) and Honey Valley (Bağlıdere)
Avanos
Çavuşin
Zelve Open Air Museum
Ortahisar
Ürgüp
Mustafapaşa (Sinasos)
Sultan Sazlığı Bird Paradise
Gaziemir
Kaymaklı Underground City
Uçhisar
Selime monastery
Yaprakhisar
Soğanlı valley
Sobessos
Devrent valley
Zemi Valley
Swords Valley (Kılıclar vadisi)
Red and Rose Valleys (Kızılcukur, Güllüdere)
Ağzıkara Han Caravanseray
Tatların
Güzelyurt
Keşlik monastery
Kocabağ winery
Gülşehir

» Aegean Region
Ephesus
Pamukkale / Hierapolis

» Eastern Turkey
Mount Nemrut
Şanlıurfa
Harran
Göbekli tepe

» Black Sea Region
TRABZON
Sümela Monastery

» Konya Region
Whirling Dervishes
The Mesnevi
Whirling Dervishes - Mevlâna, the Mystical Philosopher
The Semâ

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Cappadocia Tours
Phone: +90 384 271 2166 -
Fax: +90 384 271 2337
Goreme El Sanatlari Carsisi No: 24 50180 - Goreme - Cappadocia - TURKEY
info@newgoreme.com